Dec 01, 2016 06:47 PM EST

Job Hunting Tips: How To Be Professional and Win The Employer's Heart

By Michael Jay Arizala
'Boot Camp' For Job Seekers Held In Bay Area
Job seekers have their resumes reviewed during a 'Boot Camp' for job seekers at the San Mateo County Expo Center January 28, 2010 in San Mateo, California. Hundreds of job seekers attended the day-long job boot camp that featured recruiters and workshops on how to write resumes and interview tactics. The number of unemployment claims in the U.S. fell slightly in the week ending on January 23 to 470,000 down from 478,000.
(Photo : Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The achievements and educational attainments a job seeker describes in his or her CV are not enough to guarantee them a position in the company they are applying for. Despite the specifications that an employer has pointed out in a job post, and even if the applicant has it all, sometimes the little things are the ones that give the employer the thought of saying "Welcome to the company".

The requirements that an employer asks is just some sort of "additional activity" to the filtering process. Just because the applicant meets all the requirements doesn't mean he can start wearing the suit and tie. There is a bunch of other things employers want from an applicant, far more important than the usual CV requirement.

Know the employer well before the interview. Stalking is mainstream in job hunting. Most employers prefer an applicant who knows a little bit more than just the company's name. In order to impress the interviewer, an applicant must know what to answer when asked what he knows about the company. The applicant must take to the search engine all his nescience about the organization. See if they have a website and learn about their enterprise - products, services, staff, officers, business line, competitors, etc.

A good applicant lets the employer know he exists. When waiting for any followup from the company, an applicant must be alert all the time - taking into account email messages and responding to phone calls and text messages promptly. If someone from the company informs any update, the applicant must show some courtesy by acknowledging their message coupled with a simple "Thank you".

Share the spotlight with the interviewer. According to The Muse, job interviews are a "two-way street". It means that interviewers are not the only one to give questions. The applicant can switch side with the interviewer or share the hot seat, and start asking them about any questions relevant to the job. Although, it's important to maintain politeness and avoid being aggressive. Asking job-related questions during an interview is not a bad thing. In fact, it shows that the applicant is really interested in the job and the company.

Realize that not all employment opportunities solely rely on the CV or whatever technical skills a job seeker has. Attitude and projection of an image of quality and efficiency must always be the highlights.

Also, be attentive to the questions thrown at you during an interview. Here is a report by Jobs & Hire.

Get the Most Popular Jobs&Hire Stories in a Weekly Newsletter
© 2016 Jobs & Hire All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.
TRENDING ON THE WEB

Join the Conversation

Real Time Analytics